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Black Hat USA 2018 Presentation Picks

Black Hat USA 2018 Presentation Picks

As Black Hat continues to draw closer we wanted to take a moment to highlight some talks that we are excited about. There is a lot of great content, so picking just a few was difficult, but these are the presentations that I and some of my colleagues are looking forward to attending.

 

AI & ML in Cyber Security – Why Algorithms are Dangerous

By Raffael Marty

The topic of AI disciplines is one I spend quite a bit of time talking about myself. It seems you can’t turn anywhere these days without encountering some product claiming to use a subset of AI in some “advanced” way. A healthy dose of real-world challenges helps cut through the marketing hype and get to core issues. This talk is a much-welcomed reality check.

 

Blockchain Autopsies – Analyzing Ethereum Smart Contract Deaths

By Jay Little

Blockchain technologies aren’t just for cryptocurrencies. This technology is gaining more and more acceptance in the business world and being used or evaluated to solve a range of business challenges. Blockchain technologies aligned with business challenges, like Ethereum Smart Contracts, have a higher chance of success and longevity. Understanding how these contracts work as well as the various risks they present, is critical.

 

Applied Self-Driving Car Security

By Charlie Miller, Chris Valasek

Come on, who doesn’t love the thought of hacking self-driving cars? What’s even better is getting this information from the experts on the subject. In the not too distant future, we will share the road with people taking a nap, eating lunch, and texting. Okay, we do that now, but in the future people may not have control of their cars the way they do today. Highlighting these risks now helps us avoid running  into them tomorrow. This presentation promises to be informative and entertaining.

 

Understanding and Exploiting Implanted Medical Devices

By Billy Rios, Jonathan Butts

Self-driving cars are one thing, but IoT gets scarier when it’s inside your body. Increased attack surface from a device inside your body is the stuff of nightmares and Hollywood movies. This presentation promises to shed light on these risks.

 

WebAssembly: A New World of Native Exploits on the Browser

By Justin Engler, Tyler Lukasiewicz

WebAssembly is a technology supported by all of the major browsers that allows for the compilation of languages like C, C++, and Rust for the web. WebAssembly makes a promise of better performance and increased security, but is it a lot of hot air? This talk highlights this technology and the security risks it introduces.

 

Squeezing a Key Through a Carry Bit

By Filippo Valsorda

Although this presentation isn’t some destruction-of-the-Internet-style vulnerability, it demonstrates a great example of why no small bug should be ignored. In an amazing feat of crypto engineering, by exploiting a single bit bug, the presenter shows how a cryptographer’s worse nightmare comes true. Secret keys can be recovered in about 500 submissions on average. Don’t miss this highly technical talk on the cryptography track that shows a small bug can yield a big result.

 

Kudelski Security Events

We also have a few events happening while we are out in Vegas.

Join us for our Kudelski Security Bash party Tuesday night from 6-9pm in the Foundation Room at Mandalay Bay.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/kudelski-security-bash-at-black-hat-2018-tickets-47833314732

We are also doing a couple of breakout debriefs from 4:30-6pm on Wednesday, August 8th, and Thursday, August 9th. Wednesday’s session is on IoT and Operational Technology security. Thursday’s session is on Blockchain. Use the following link to RSVP for these sessions.

https://resources.kudelskisecurity.com/iot-and-blockchain-debrief-session-black-hat-2018

 

If you are hanging out for Defcon as well, check out our presentation:

Reaping and Breaking Keys at Scale: When Crypto Meets Big Data

Presented by Yolan Romailler and Nils Amiet.

In this talk, we show how we collected over 300 million public keys leveraging our scanning infrastructure and our open source fingerprinting tool, Scannerl, and tested them for vulnerabilities such as the recent ROCA vulnerability or factorization using batch-GCD. We performed this analysis on a 280 vCPU cluster and are able to test new keys against our dataset in just a few minutes thanks to a novel in-house distributed implementation of the algorithm. As a result of our research, we could have impersonated hundreds of people, mimicked thousands of servers and performed MitM attacks on over 200k websites. Fun stuff.

If you see any of us around the week after next, say hello. See you at Black Hat and Defcon!